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Who we are


Baladi Home is a home decor brand that creates an international marketplace for ethically made Egyptian artisan products. Each purchase empowers artisans and preserves culture, providing a sustainable lifeline to keep their time-honored craftsmanship alive.

 

Authentic
design

Baladi Home creates home goods that are authentic to Egypt, using native and sustainable materials. Our products are reimagined and modernized designs inspired by the rich cultural artifacts of Egyptian civilizations.

Small
batches

When you browse our collection, you’ll notice that there’s usually some things out of stock. This is because Baladi Home products are all handcrafted in small batches by artisans in their own workshops, making them rare and unique.

Doing
good

Each purchase from Baladi Home reinvigorates the Egyptian artisan communities by paying fair trade wages. We also provide medical convoys, as well as literacy classes, business workshops, product development help, and help with acquiring tools and raw supplies through our partner on the ground.

 

Our Name

Baladi (pronounced ba·la·di) literally means “my country” in Arabic. While it can be used to lovingly talk about anybody’s home country, Egyptians have a special bond with the word. To them, it means so much more. It’s a word that rolls off their tongues on a daily basis as they order baladi bread, or baladi lemons, or when they go back to the balad, referring to their homes in the countryside. It is mentioned in popular music such as in this recent cover of Dalida’s Helwa ya Baladi (My beautiful country), and by the Egyptian queen of music Oum Kalthoum in her song Ala Baladi Elmahboub (Take me to my beloved country).

Suzanne Zeidy describes it nicely in her book Cairo Kitchen: “Baladi refers to anything that is more rural than urban, more indigenous than international, something that is fundamentally Egyptian in nature.”

The logo is derived from the ancient hieroglyphic meaning “Lord of Upper and Lower Egypt” It can also be interpreted as a simplified drawing of a bowl resting on two plates.